New Strategy For Staff-Student Games

Last March, I was on the teacher team in the high school staff-student basketball game. The teachers had wisely chosen the smaller East Gym as the location of the game (less running for old legs) and the strategy paid off with a double-digit lead. In the past, this would usually mean that the coach-less students would start to play more individually and the lead would grow even more but on this occasion, the students actually started passing more and playing tougher defence. Before we knew it, we were shaking hands after the first teacher defeat in recent memory.

I was watching an interview with NBA star Stephen Curry on the weekend about his Grade 7 year when his father (Del) was a member of the Toronto Raptors and Stephen was a student at the now-defunct Queensway Christian School. In the interview were photos of Stephen and his teammates with the Mentor College Invitational championship plaque and a story from his coach about their big comeback in the tournament finals. It was a really great game to watch and having an NBA Dad in our gym at the same time made it an even more exciting day for everyone in attendance. The piece also included some crackly video footage of Stephen playing in a staff-student game with his Dad as an honourary staff member for the day.

In this week’s update, I noticed that my experience is not just a high school phenomenon. Despite the obvious height and experience advantage, the TEAM teachers went down to defeat at the hands of the Primary (Grade 1 to 3) students in the recent, annual “Hoops For Heart” staff-student game. So while it could be argued that the students are so well-coached by our teachers that they are unbeatable, I think it is much more obvious what needs to be done. If anyone knows if Kyle Lowry, Jonas Valanciunas or Demar DeRozan have a teaching degree, please have them send me their résumé…and preferably before this year’s high school staff-student game!

Chris Starkey
Administrative Principal
Mentor College / TEAM School

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s